Last week, Nuclear Matters’ Co-Chair Sen. Judd Gregg traveled to Cambridge, Massachusetts to attend the MIT Energy Conference. Here are 4 things we learned from his remarks:

1) Nuclear energy is a bipartisan issue. That’s one of the reasons Sen. Gregg joined Nuclear Matters: “Watching the presidential campaign, you wouldn’t think the parties are agreeing on anything, but there are some places they could meet. Nuclear energy is one of them.”  

2) Electricity markets do not value zero-carbon electricity sources — nuclear energy receives no economic credit for producing carbon-free electricity.  

3) If you were to close all the nuclear plants in the US, it would be equivalent to putting 135 million cars (more than all passenger cars in the US!) on the road in terms of carbon emissions.

4) There are a number of nuclear plants that are being closed before their useful life is up – and that's a failure of public policy.

 

To learn more about the “perfect storm” of policy and economic issues facing the existing nuclear fleet, click here.  

To learn more about the carbon-free benefits of the existing fleet, click here.

 

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4 Things We Learned About Nuclear Energy at the MIT Energy Conference

4 Things We Learned About Nuclear Energy at the MIT Energy Conference · Mar 10, 2016 1:00 PM

Last week, Nuclear Matters’ Co-Chair Sen. Judd Gregg traveled to Cambridge, Massachusetts to attend the MIT Energy Conference. Here are 4 things we learned from his remarks:

1) Nuclear energy is a bipartisan issue. That’s one of the reasons Sen. Gregg joined Nuclear Matters: “Watching the presidential campaign, you wouldn’t think the parties are agreeing on anything, but there are some places they could meet. Nuclear energy is one of them.”  

2) Electricity markets do not value zero-carbon electricity sources — nuclear energy receives no economic credit for producing carbon-free electricity.  

3) If you were to close all the nuclear plants in the US, it would be equivalent to putting 135 million cars (more than all passenger cars in the US!) on the road in terms of carbon emissions.

4) There are a number of nuclear plants that are being closed before their useful life is up – and that's a failure of public policy.

 

To learn more about the “perfect storm” of policy and economic issues facing the existing nuclear fleet, click here.  

To learn more about the carbon-free benefits of the existing fleet, click here.